FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Q. What is the definition of cure inhibition and what can I do if my bag experiences cure inhibition?

Q. Will the use of SWORL silicone vacuum bags cause the development of fisheyes in gel coats and on painted surfaces?

Q. May resin flow channels be molded directly into a SWORL reusable vacuum bag as it is made to eliminate the cost of this single-use “accessory” for vacuum molding?

Q. What is the best way to seal SWORL silicone vacuum bags?

Q. If a flange-sealed SWORLĂ´ vacuum bag leaks, what is the easiest way to locate the leak?

Q. How can I ensure that the SWORL reusable vacuum bag will conform tightly to the contours of the part being fabricated?

Q. May a gelcoated or two-sided finished part be infused in one step using a SWORL reusable vacuum bag?

Q. SWORL Coverage Calculations


    

Q.  What is the definition of cure inhibition and what can I do if my bag experiences cure inhibition? 

A.  Cure Inhibition may be identified as a sticky residue left between PRSI and the product it comes into contact with.  It is highly recommended that you check for Cure inhibition on all the different surfaces which PRSI may come into contact with.  Once a PRSI bag is cured, inhibition will not occur.  If Cure inhibition does occur, mask the area that is causing the cure inhibition so PRSI can be applied.

    

Q.  Will the use of SWORL silicone vacuum bags cause the development of fisheyes in gel coats and on painted surfaces? 

A.  The appearance of fisheyes in painted auto parts was first identified by Ford Motor Company in 1972.  Ford traced its problem to silicone contamination however, there are two different types of silicone and only one contributes to this type of problem.

The silicones used in consumer toiletries, elastomers and semi-permanent mold releases are reactive silicone fluids known as polydimethylsiloxanes that bind to other molecules in the chemical formulation, leaving no free silicone to migrate into the atmosphere. 

SWORL PRSI products are in the class of reactive silicones.  PRSI silicones are Room Temperature Vulcanizing (RTV) products which are designed to cure very quickly.  PRSI silicones are splatter-applied rather than atomized to further minimize the possibility of unwanted introduction into surrounding work areas.

By contrast, silicone lubricants are emulsions of non-reactive polydimethylsiloxane (non-reactive silicone fluid) which are dispersed in solvent.  After the solvents flash off, the raw, non-reactive silicone remains in liquid form on the part, acting as a long-lasting lubricant.  The molecules comprising the non-reactive silicone lubricants, are extremely small and can easily migrate into air ducts and, ultimately, paint areas, producing the fisheyes that were seen first at Ford many years ago.

    

Q.  May resin flow channels be molded directly into a SWORL reusable vacuum bag as it is made to eliminate the cost of this single-use “accessory” for vacuum molding?

A.  Resin flow channels may be molded directly into the SWORL bag during bag fabrication using the Resin Race Way Wax listed under SWORL accessories.  Methods of molding flow channels into the SWORL bag during fabrication are described in Seeman's patent #5,316,462.  Please contact Seeman directly for further details and for permission to use its patented technology.

    

Q.  What is the best way to seal SWORL silicone vacuum bags?

A. Today’s emerging technology has allowed for improvement in the bag sealing versus traditional methods.  The Integral Reusable Vacuum Bag Seal (IRVBS) built into the bag during fabrication is considered a preferred way to create a resin stop seal to seal the bag.
Please refer to this SWORL patented technology on our site under “Processes – IRVBS.”

The previously preferred method for producing a vacuum tight reusable bag was to utilize a secondary sealing frame which clamped the bag to the outer flange of the mold.  Prairie Technology Group has innovated a newly designed “V” groove perimeter HiVac seal to eliminate the use of frames and tacky tape.  The “V” groove built into the mold requires the bag to follow complex geometries of the flange and will seal without the use of any products other than vacuum.  Sealing the outer perimeter has been a major obstacle that has slowed the advancement of vacuum bagging technology for years.

    

Q. If a flange-sealed SWORL™ vacuum bag leaks, what is the easiest way to locate the leak? 

A.  Although leaks are not as common with SWORL flange sealed bags as with the disposable bag process, leaks do occur on occasion. If SWORL reusable vacuum bags develop small leaks, the best way to quickly find the leak is with a commercially available leak detector. Contact us for a leak detector solution.

    

Q.  How can I ensure that the SWORL reusable vacuum bag will conform tightly to the contours of the part being fabricated?

A.  The SWORL silicone process produces “net shape” bags.

For thin laminate parts, the bag may be sprayed directly on the prepared mold surface.  Shrinkage is NIL.

For thick laminate parts, manufacturers have a choice of building the bag over a dimensional waxed mold or over an existing part.

    

Q.  May a gelcoated or two-sided finished part be infused in one step using a SWORL reusable vacuum bag?

A. Yes.  Manufacturers are saving time and cutting costs by producing parts with gel-coated surfaces and two-sided finished surfaces by using lightweight, low-cost counter molds, or platens, to create the second finished surface.  With counter molds, after a part is laid up on the lower mold half, the counter mold is simply placed over the completed laminate.  Then, the entire tool is placed under the pre-made, contoured SWORL reusable bag and infusion can begin.  Pigmented resin may also be used to provide a “paint like” finish.

    

Q. SWORL Coverage Calculations

PRSI 308 PAIL CALCULATIONS: 22Kg pail kit
@ 0.250 in. finished bag thickness = 35.72 sq. ft. /per pail
@ 0.125 in. finished bag thickness = 71.45 sq. ft. /per pail

COST CALCULATIONS: Please call to discuss your specific application in order to determine costs.  Part geometries will impact coverage and cost calculations.

    
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